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87 Clockers


Alt Names: alt 87Clockersalt 87超频者alt エイティセブン・クロックース
Author: NINOMIYA Tomoko
Artist: NINOMIYA Tomoko
Genres: Comedy ComedyDrama DramaRomance RomanceSeinen SeinenSlice of Life Slice of Life
Type: Manga (Japanese)
Status: Ongoing
Description: Ichinose, a violin music student, is coming towards a crossroads in his life. He has to decide what to do with his future, but he doesn't feel pulled towards any one particular dream. In the absence of any ambition, he decides to work alongside his mother, who is a piano teacher, and teach violin. But one night, he sees a pretty, sad girl standing barefoot outside an apartment. A little investigation shows that she seems to share the apartment with a cat and a mysterious guy called Mike. Will meeting her be the trigger that can change his dull life?

New series from Ninomiya Tomoko known for Nodame Cantabile.
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Chapters

Title Group Contributor Date
Vol.3 Ch.16 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo A week ago
Vol.3 Ch.15 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 2 weeks ago
Vol.3 Ch.14 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 2 weeks ago
Vol.3 Ch.13 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 3 weeks ago
Vol.3 Ch.12 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 4 weeks ago
Vol.2 Ch.11 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 17 June 2014 - 04:40 AM
Vol.2 Ch.10 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 13 May 2014 - 08:46 PM
Vol.2 Ch.9 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 22 April 2014 - 05:17 AM
Vol.2 Ch.8 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 12 April 2014 - 04:19 AM
Vol.2 Ch.7 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 09 April 2014 - 05:08 AM
Vol.2 Ch.6 Read Online
HappyScans! KidCongo 03 April 2014 - 07:18 AM
Vol.1 Ch.5 Read Online
HappyScans! & Manga at the End of Time KidCongo 16 December 2013 - 04:57 PM
Vol.1 Ch.4 Read Online
HappyScans! & Manga at the End of Time KidCongo 09 December 2013 - 06:34 AM
Vol.1 Ch.3 Read Online
HappyScans! & Manga at the End of Time KidCongo 17 November 2013 - 06:41 AM
Ch.2 Read Online
Hobo-1 KidCongo 18 September 2011 - 02:00 PM
Ch.1 Read Online
Hobo-1 KidCongo 18 September 2011 - 01:57 PM [A]


42 Comments

So the one team have that kid who's gonna

Spoiler
, but I have this weird feeling it isn't going to end up mattering much....

 

I shouldn't comment at all, except to remind the community that in Nodame Cantabile it seems like things that turned out seeming not to matter ended up mattering in ways we didn't expect.

 

I've been monitoring Ninomiya-sensei's blog and twitter account in hopes that she might give a hint about the future of 87C, now that JumpX is folding (as of November). While she has not given so much as a peep about that, today she tweeted a link about an upcoming OC event in Roppongi (in Aug) in which her supervising editor "duck-san" is a participant. Here is the link to the article. It's in Japanese but there are some interesting pics.

 

http://www.itmedia.co.jp/pcuser/articles/1407/14/news138.html

So the one team have that kid who's gonna

Spoiler
, but I have this weird feeling it isn't going to end up mattering much.  If some mangaka were writing this it would be the huge deal (ultimately defeated by Our Heroes because their hearts are true), but I feel like with Ninomiya-sensei it will just fizzle somehow.

This dude's mom and sister are the best characters in this.

YOUR MISTAKE WAS IN THINKING THIS IS AKIBA

tumblr_ltgzwdVkra1qmzq91o1_500.gif

 

No, you sir are mistaken

 

das-ist-deutschland.jpg

7-1

I'm curious is it mike or me-kay?

 

That's a really good question without a clear answer. I think in Japan for sure it is "Mee-kay" but in other countries it is probably "Mike". The raws give either in roman letters and in katakana, depending on context. In particular, it always appears as "Mike" (i.e. roman letters) in "facenote" and other online posts, so the rest of the world is probably saying "mike". Having said all that, in Ch. 1 Ninomiya gives the pronunciation as "mee-kay" (furi katakana) next to the first occurence of "MIKE".

I'm curious is it mike or me-kay?

I love how his opponents take it so well. It's kinda refreshing

I find it more weird that they're doing this in front of a tagged cow.

Volume 5 cover:

Spoiler

This series is wonderful. Just started it today and already hooked with it.

YOUR MISTAKE WAS IN THINKING THIS IS AKIBA

tumblr_ltgzwdVkra1qmzq91o1_500.gif

Volume 5 cover:

Spoiler

okay superPi that was serious oc.in this story

No need to get all defensive, as nothing I wrote was aimed at putting you down or anything. The latter part of my post was just me going off on a tangent a bit.

However, you do seem to be mistaken on the assumption, that UEFI is an MS tech. The largest influence over it is Intel, although its development has been overseen by dozens of entities. While I'm no guru when it comes to Linux, UEFI is by no means something that MS could alter just to inherently hinder Linux users.

UEFI or no UEFI, the overclocking features on today's motherboards are quite sufficient - even on the lower-end ones, so I don't see any point in Valve developing their own BIOS/UEFI replacement, or motherboards to go along with that, as it would cost a crapton, the improvements, if any, would be marginal, and would only be relevant to a miniscule percentage of their clientele. Thus, the only other assumption I could make from your previous post was that you were implying a change aimed at locking down stuff - which, judging by your latest post I assume we can both agree, is not consistent with Valve's MO either.

I don't know what things are like now, no doubt Intel is key.  But when UEFI and in particular Secure Boot (a key UEFI technology) were initially being developed and pushed, Microsoft was all over them, a major driving force behind their adoption.  Microsoft has also used its influence over OEMs to arrange it so that MS has control over the private keys needed to get an OS trusted on computers sold by most OEMs.  In that sense, MS is at any rate the gatekeeper for the Secure Boot portion of UEFI.  

Apple don't care, they make their own hardware.  But for Linux people, the defining feature of Secure Boot was that with this MS control of keys, it made it impossible to load a Linux operating system.  The technology effectively defined any open source OS as "not trusted" and blocked 'em.  Still does, really--workarounds have been found and some keys wangled by some major distributions, but it took a fair amount of effort, stinks being raised with European competition bureaus and whatnot, and some dude with the Linux Foundation won an award for coming up with the main technique currently used.  Since on the other hand, it's fairly easy for a user (and easier for a hacker) to simply turn Secure Boot off, it was always pretty clear to everyone in the Linux community that Secure Boot security claims were largely a smoke screen for Microsoft's attempts give it the ol' college try one more time to make Linux hard to install or use by making the technology ecosystem around it incompatible.  It wouldn't be the first time, or even the tenth.

 

So, again, the technology may now be entrenched enough that Valve will have little choice other than to use UEFI, but anyone pushing a Linux OS, which SteamOS is, would have a motivation to use some other technology if they could get away with it.

Translator here. I know nothing about overclocking, but I do know about Ninomiya-sensei, and I doubt she just made up the oc controllers. I think we are to infer that the events are taking place ca. 2010 (when the serialization started), and in that timeframe I can find references to similar OC controllers on Google, mainly the ASUS controller of 2009 vintage. (Which I grant you apparently has no switches, but it has a nice big knob.)

Ha, nice find! :) I doubt this would be compatible outside of a very specific hardware set-up, but I'll definitely have to look into this further.

Also, thanks a bunch for the releases! Great job so far.

In-OS overclocking is indeed possible via special software (definitely haven't heard anything about switch flipping, though, lol)

 

Translator here. I know nothing about overclocking, but I do know about Ninomiya-sensei, and I doubt she just made up the oc controllers. I think we are to infer that the events are taking place ca. 2010 (when the serialization started), and in that timeframe I can find references to similar OC controllers on Google, mainly the ASUS controller of 2009 vintage. (Which I grant you apparently has no switches, but it has a nice big knob.)

From what I understand valve isn't building hardware in the same way that nintendo/sony/microsoft or the android console guys are.  Its basically an OS with a set of guidelines for the hardware, which is basically normal pc hardware.  Although there is an official steambox valve is releasing it's still standard parts in a valve designed case with valves own controller. And  UEFI for the MB is a requirements I believe, but as with many things there is a hack/work around that people have come up with to install on a MB with BIOS. UEFI is not a product of Microsoft although they are apart of the group of companies that decide the specs.  I think it's Intel that is actually pushing it more and it'll probably be the standard until whatever comes next.

I'm pretty sure I've been saying precisely the opposite--that they would prefer open.  Specifically, I suspect they would be against the things using UEFI, a Microsoft technology which basically is there to be annoying for non-MS operating systems.  Yes, I know MS make various technical claims about UEFI and secure boot and whatnot, but I've never gotten the impression they held much water.  Like many Microsoft technologies, the real purpose seems to be mostly to create roadblocks in the way of use of anyone else's technology.  So yeah, with SteamOS being a Linux, and Valve not liking Microsoft or Windows much, I suspect they'd want to avoid an MS tech that puts hurdles in front of Linux.  

It would also be possible they might put some money or effort into bumping up the development of an open source BIOS project, although that's a longer shot.

I'm confident you have more technical knowhow than I do, so, fine, kowtow, I am not worthy and so forth.  On the other hand, I'm increasingly feeling you aren't reading what I write before you go off on me.  Which makes me think you just want to show off by taking someone down.  That kind of lowers the respect factor again.

No need to get all defensive, as nothing I wrote was aimed at putting you down or anything. The latter part of my post was just me going off on a tangent a bit.

However, you do seem to be mistaken on the assumption, that UEFI is an MS tech. The largest influence over it is Intel, although its development has been overseen by dozens of entities. While I'm no guru when it comes to Linux, UEFI is by no means something that MS could alter just to inherently hinder Linux users.

UEFI or no UEFI, the overclocking features on today's motherboards are quite sufficient - even on the lower-end ones, so I don't see any point in Valve developing their own BIOS/UEFI replacement, or motherboards to go along with that, as it would cost a crapton, the improvements, if any, would be marginal, and would only be relevant to a miniscule percentage of their clientele. Thus, the only other assumption I could make from your previous post was that you were implying a change aimed at locking down stuff - which, judging by your latest post I assume we can both agree, is not consistent with Valve's MO either.

It would be absolutely insane for Valve to invest millions into something that would lock down their new platform, gather negative publicity, and alienate a portion of their fans, even more so considering the third-party SteamBox manufacturers will be offering viable alternatives for anyone to grab and use.

 

I'm pretty sure I've been saying precisely the opposite--that they would prefer open.  Specifically, I suspect they would be against the things using UEFI, a Microsoft technology which basically is there to be annoying for non-MS operating systems.  Yes, I know MS make various technical claims about UEFI and secure boot and whatnot, but I've never gotten the impression they held much water.  Like many Microsoft technologies, the real purpose seems to be mostly to create roadblocks in the way of use of anyone else's technology.  So yeah, with SteamOS being a Linux, and Valve not liking Microsoft or Windows much, I suspect they'd want to avoid an MS tech that puts hurdles in front of Linux.  

It would also be possible they might put some money or effort into bumping up the development of an open source BIOS project, although that's a longer shot.

I'm confident you have more technical knowhow than I do, so, fine, kowtow, I am not worthy and so forth.  On the other hand, I'm increasingly feeling you aren't reading what I write before you go off on me.  Which makes me think you just want to show off by taking someone down.  That kind of lowers the respect factor again.

Aaaaaand there we delve into fiction, haha. In-OS overclocking is indeed possible via special software (definitely haven't heard anything about switch flipping, though, lol), but is NOT recommended, as it's unreliable: altering BIOS values grants more precision, less voltage fluctuation, and , in turn, better stability. Furthermore, giant leaps of faith, like Mike did, are not recommended either: it's a gamble. If it boots and is stable, good for you, but since all processors OC differently, you're likely to crash and have to waste time either backing down to see at what point it boots again, or blindly increase voltages to accommodate the raised clockspeed - and THAT is definitely not a good way to do things. Slow and steady all the way folks ;)

Oh, and I'm not throwing rocks into the author's garden - a degree of fiction and inaccuracies is to be expected. It's just a warning to those of you who might have been inspired to try this out yourself.

For a good list of OC guides and a treasure trove of information concerning anything computer-related, visit the overclock.net forums.

 

Now then, I wonder if they'll pull out the "OMG he's not only OCing the CPU, but the GPU as well!" card next chapter ^^

 

Thanks for the release, HappyScans!

That would be true if we were discussing SteamOS on its own, but we are instead discussing the upcoming Steam Machines, which will run SteamOS but which are physical devices, sort of PC-as-a-game-console things.  True, they will have somewhat open specifications--but it does seem that Valve will be exercising some degree of control over how the things are built.  And they may release some of their own directly.  So yes, a Steam Machine would have a BIOS and Valve might have a say in what that BIOS was.

Unless Valve suddenly hired a division of motherboard engineers, dumped millions into R&D to design the hardware from scratch, and started manufacturing their own MoBos just for the sake of altering a few basic control options that don't really affect 99% of their customer base in any way whatsoever...

You see where I'm going with this, don't you? :)

One does not simply start manufacturing PC components out of the blue.

Steam machines, as you may have noticed, are offered by a large variety of manufacturers, who'll be using all sorts of different hardware. The low-end ones might be locked down, if they go the low-lange Intel route, or be completely open for tinkering if they go with AMD.In the high-end segment, everything should be ready for messing around, as they'll likely be running the unlocked intel CPUs, and there isn't much that's more wasteful than having a high-end unlocked CPU in a locked-down mobo. Besides, the last mobo I saw that didn't haven even basic support for overclocking(most laptops aside) was back in the early LGA775 era, some 8-ish years ago.
It would be absolutely insane for Valve to invest millions into something that would lock down their new platform, gather negative publicity, and alienate a portion of their fans, even more so considering the third-party SteamBox manufacturers will be offering viable alternatives for anyone to grab and use.

 

 

On a different note, thanks for the chapter, HappyScans! :)

Well this was pretty boring to me, until Julia showed up, man now this is really fun xD

BIOS types are based on your motherboard, not your OS. Whether Steam want to or not it's not up to them to choose what type of BIOS you use.

That would be true if we were discussing SteamOS on its own, but we are instead discussing the upcoming Steam Machines, which will run SteamOS but which are physical devices, sort of PC-as-a-game-console things.  True, they will have somewhat open specifications--but it does seem that Valve will be exercising some degree of control over how the things are built.  And they may release some of their own directly.  So yes, a Steam Machine would have a BIOS and Valve might have a say in what that BIOS was.

This is some overspecific bullshit, though. I mean, the author's aware of it so it's all good, but a guy getting into not just computers, but such a particular aspect of them, for a girl's sake...and now a different girl, with an air-cooling obsession, has got him into some kind of Crysis-running tournament?

 

I love how a competent author can basically drag me into anything they want.

This is hilarious.

Hmmm, yeah--since Valve is basically taking a poke at Microsoft with this thing, and waving the openness flag, and is going to be doing their own hardware (although since the specs are open others can put them out too), I'd suspect they'll skip UEFI and use a normal BIOS, maybe even an open one.  All the indications are that the thing is going to be all around unlocked enough to mess with.

On the GPU side I'm way out of my depth to even start to comment.

 

BIOS types are based on your motherboard, not your OS. Whether Steam want to or not it's not up to them to choose what type of BIOS you use.


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